31 May, 2011

31 May, 1944

438th AAA AW BN
APO 654 % Postmaster, N.Y.
England
31 May, 1944        0720

Dearest darling Wilma –

Although we had a pretty good thunderstorm yesterday p.m. – the heat wave – if you can call it that – is still with us. The highest it has been here is somewhere in the low or middle 80’s, but it rarely gets that hot here, and if it does, it doesn’t last long. We have the same humidity here that Boston has, with the complete lassitude etc. that goes with it. Yesterday – it was really quite annoying – but fortunately, I didn’t have too much to do, dear.

I got no mail yesterday, but having heard from you the day before, I really didn’t expect any.

Say – in reading about Mr. Clark’s home – I find you really enthused, darling. And to top it off you say you’d really adore aplace like that. Now if you’re going to get ideas like that this early in life, maybe you’d better not go out there quite so often? It does sound nice, though, dear – and I’m glad you’re enjoying your trips out there.


You mention Rosalyn (do I know her?) graduating Holyoke and that she called and wondered how you kept from being bored. I sometimes have wondered about that too, darling. You never mention that you are, for which I’m grateful – because I hate to think of you getting tired of ‘hanging around’, dear – although sometimes it must seem just like that, I’m sure. As for you and me in the days when we first went out, sweetheart, – I, too, liked to be alone with you rather than with anyone else; you knew that. And I’d have stayed out all hours of the night, if I thought we could get away with it. I knew how your mother felt about late hours – so “why antagonize her?” I thought. After all, darling, I was trying to make a good impression. But don’t try to make me believe that I immediately opened the door of my car, dear!! Seems to me – there was usually a slight delay – you must remember. And, dearest, you shouldn’t feel surprised at the things you admit to me – for after all, if not to me, then to whom?

Today being the end of the month – means a little extra running around. In the days when we were in Camp, it was a simple thing getting the men’s pay. It’s different here; you have to hit the right finance office – in the right city – i.e. right for your outfit. Anyway – at 1030 this a.m. – the B.C.’s and I have to go to a nearby town and get the pounds, shillings and pence for the boys’ mild and bitters. And how they go through it, too!

I’ll have to stop now, sweetheart, and get going down to the dispensary. My thoughts are always with you, dear, day and night – and all I do is dream of the days when I’ll finally be with you. Remember darling that I’m very much in love with you and miss you terribly –

Love to the folks – and

All my love to you
Greg

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